Still Lifes of Georgio Morandi (by Clairan Ferrono)

Still Life 1956

Still Life 1956

 

I was introduced to the work of Georgio Morandi several years ago by my friend Barbara Fitzpatrick, who is an architect, painter, and now my drawing instructor.  At first I was puzzled by her enthusiasm for what looked to me like dull, repetitive, almost monochromatic, paintings of bottles and boxes? painted chunks of cement? blocks of old cheese?  I couldn’t even always make out what the objects were.  But Barb assured me I should keep on looking.  So look I did.  And the work began to intrigue me.

 

Still Life

Still Life

 

And I found myself going back to look again and again. The paintings are quiet, deceptively simple.  The objects can appear both flat and 3 dimensional at the same time.

 

Natura Morta II

Natura Morta II

 

Despite the apparent lack of color, there are many subtle shifts of value.

Still Life 1946

Still Life 1946

Still Life 1952

Still Life 1952

 still Life 1955


still Life 1955

 

When I first started drawing with Barb as my teacher, she had us look at Morandi carefully and attempt to draw one of his still lifes.   And it was then that I really started to look at the relationships among his objects, the shapes and volumes of his forms, the spaces between the bottles and boxes, the shadows, the subtle textural shifts, the places where one object almost, almost fades into another, but just doesn’t quite. or perhaps, in fact,  does.

Still Life 1960

Still Life 1960

 

But the aha! moment really came very recently.  I had been working on a piece and I knew it was close to finished,  but I was reverse appliqueing shapes to a background and I couldn’t get them quite right. I was satisfied with the shapes themselves and the background was good too. But they wouldn’t come together.  And then, the Morandi moment. . . . I remembered to look at the negative space.  And that was it.  Bang, they came together.  Thank you Morandi (and Barbara).

 

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2 Responses to “Still Lifes of Georgio Morandi (by Clairan Ferrono)”


  1. 1 clairan November 2, 2014 at 12:23 pm

    Thanks Olga. That was great. I will have to find that little museum the next time I’m in London

  2. 2 olganorris November 2, 2014 at 8:28 am

    Clairan, you might be interested in reading this blog post about a Morandi exhibition that was on in London last year: http://gerryco23.wordpress.com/2013/01/24/giorgio-morandi-lines-of-poetry/


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